Twisted Buildings, Part 3

A new, bright house, and a cobblestone mat!

Allow me to present the newest addition to my Twisted city: a decidedly whimsical No. 42 Carver Lane house!  My first copy of this building, with a distinctly more serious tone, was featured heavily in my Twisted Buildings, Part 1 post.

Twisted No. 42 Carver Lane 11

My initial, more subdued take on this house:

 

The bright, cheery shop:

 

It’s probably no surprise if you had a look at my last post that I was pleased with the color scheme from my first Old Corner Shop.  I decided to carry on with a similar look, using turquoise accents instead of blue, with this newest house.

Here are some additional angles on the new house:

 

Hold up,” I can almost hear you audibly protest.  “Isn’t steampunk a gritty, dirty, Industrial Revolution-esque setting?  Just what exactly is she doing painting these like this?  Surely she can’t think these are done?!?  Where is the dirt?  The weathering? The dried up tears of laborers returning from the workhouse?”  Well, hold onto your hat, dear reader, because I’m about to blow your mind!

Twisted Rulebook

 

The world of Twisted is a truly unique steampunk setting centered around the machinations (see what I did there?) of The Engine, an infinitely powerful and ancient entity that shapes the world and lives of its inhabitants according to its own designs.  It can influence the world in any number of ways, and the different factions in the game can tap into its power if they can garner its favor.  The Engine is a little like GW’s Tzeentch in that complicated coincidences and events in the world happen just as planned.  One of the ways that I imagine The Engine keeps the society of Twisted under control is by altering people’s perception of reality.  My inspiration here is from a couple of video games.

Bioshock is one of my favorite video game franchises, and one of my favorite sequences in the franchise is when you get to play as a Little Sister in Bioshock 2 and see the world through her eyes.  As a Little Sister, you see what is in reality a decaying and gruesome environment as a stunning, bright, and somewhat trippy paradise.  The dead splicers the Little Sisters harvest ADAM from actually appear to them as angels, making their constant chatter about such things finally make sense.  They are little girls, after all, and this altered perception helps them to do their job without being traumatized.  Sometimes my husband and I joke that our cat has “Little Sister-vision” when he seems to be obsessed with nothing.  Who knows what he can see in his little kitty mind?

Another instance of this type of altered perception in a bleak and depressing video game world is in We Happy Few.  Admittedly, I have never played this game, but I’m an avid Twitch and YouTube viewer, and let’s plays are one of my favorite things to watch.  In We Happy Few, the populace are kept docile and surface-level “happy” with the hallucinogenic drug Joy, provided and in many cases forced on them, of course, by a dystopian government.  When your character in the game takes Joy, you have a very different, brighter, and more whimsical experience of the world around you.

All of this is to explain that my vision for Twisted is that The Engine alters people’s perception of the world around them so they believe that they live in an idyllic, cheerful place.  By giving them this view, they will continue to work hard, feel satisfied, and be blissfully unaware of The Engine’s influence and plans for them.  I think I have executed this vision pretty well so far.  I realize it isn’t for everyone, but I want you to know that I have put some thought into it.

And now, by popular demand, due to dwindling counter space, because these buildings deserve to be observed in their proper habitat, and without further ado, here is the complete-to-date Twisted city perched lovingly upon a delightful vinyl cobblestone mat by GameMatz!

much cobble.  very stone.  so city.  such Twisted.  wow.

 

If you’re dying to see some Twisted miniatures to go along with all of these buildings (or you are at least vaguely curious to see them), then please send your good vibes toward my husband, Alex, who has agreed to start painting some up.  Why aren’t I going to paint some myself?  Am I truly horrible at painting miniatures?  Is MDF the only medium with which I can create?  Nah, I’m actually pretty good at painting minis.  The reason I am, of course, is Alex!  He has been gaming and painting much longer than I have, and he always gives me just the right guidance if I’m stuck or frustrated when painting a model.  I will definitely paint miniatures again, but he’s a lot more motivated to do it right now.  I’ve really regained my painting mojo with these buildings lately.  My table full of assembled but unpainted Twisted terrain is looking more and more empty.  This blog is keeping me motivated, and I can’t wait to see the project completed.

Next up: I would like a bit of a reprieve from full-sized buildings, so I’ll take a stab at my Twisted Staircases and Twisted Walkways.  If I’m feeling especially motivated this coming week, I’ll also paint up at least some of my Twisted Street Lamps.

After that: I’ll finish up the last two shops and the last two houses.  I also have two absolutely adorable gypsy traveler caravans (in bow top and ledge styles) and a truck from Sarissa Precision to paint up and add to the city.

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Author: hobbyhoo

I'm a high school English and history teacher with a huge love for tabletop games and pretty much any creative hobby I've ever tried.

2 thoughts on “Twisted Buildings, Part 3”

  1. Hi Hobbyhoo,
    I’ve just come across your work, and like it very much. There isn’t tons of ‘real world’ info on Twisted terrain, so yours is appreciated. If I’ve read the dates on your blog correctly, you’ve not posted for a while, so please take this as a polite ‘nudge’ – I’d like to see how things might have developed 🙂
    Paul

    Like

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